Archive for capoeira performances

A Day for Mestre Carlos

Posted in 1 with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 29, 2009 by testcapo

Mestre Carlos was not only our teacher but a very close friend. I will always remember the day when Palhaço called me to tell me that he passed away. September 27, 2006. I cried a lot. I was sad because I lost a friend and teacher.  I couldn’t comprehend our lose. I didn’t understand the enormity of who we lost. It was just too big.

The first day after his death our house became the mourning space for all of the capoeirtas. We all just sat there. Speechless. But we were there together, like the family that we have always been.

Once the word got out of his passing, the phone calls started to come in. People calling us to confirm what they heard. We became not only the mourners but the consolers.

But Mestre Carlos was not going down like that. People were not going to wear black to a somber funeral. He was going to have us celebrate his life. So for the next week we danced, we drummed and we played capoeira. It was the ultimate celebration of Carlos’ life.

And we haven’t stopped. What has now become a new tradition, Mission Cultural Center hosts ‘A Day for Carlos.’ On this day Mestre Carlos’ capoeira students, drummers and dancers come together to celebrate his incredible life. The event started off with a capoeira roda in the lobby of the center. After the roda we went upstairs for live drumming and dance class. And, of course, as always, we brought the celebration to the streets. Here are some videos of the event.

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Carnaval 2009!!!

Posted in Photos, Updates! with tags , , , , , , , , , , on May 28, 2009 by testcapo

San Francisco Carnaval is now over and also a huge success. This years theme was FOGOsynthesis and Fogo Na Roupa and Omulu Capoeira Guanabara respresented! Here are some pics from the parade….

The Aceituno Arts Crew

The Aceituno Arts Crew

Some of the Aceituno Arts Girls....

Some of the Aceituno Arts Girls....

Palhaço Sportin' the Afro

Palhaço Sportin' the Afro

Jose and Metzi

Jose and Metzi

Paraná Eeeeeee!!

Posted in Capoeira nuggets, Capoeira Songs with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 4, 2009 by testcapo

We went over ‘E Paraná’ in our class yesterday and breifly touched on why Paraná is included in several capoeira songs. I was able to pull up an excellent article that goes into more detail…..

This article was taken from http://www.capoeira-connection.com.

Paraná River

Why sing Paraná ê?
Written by Formada Ana Marley & Manuel de Querino
Tuesday, 19 February 2008

Translated into English by Shayna McHugh

Source: Capoeira Santista

Much of capoeira’s philosophy and history is recorded between the lines of its songs, not forgetting that part of this history is linked with that of Brazil. This is why it’s important to research and question the meaning of some songs, since their main purpose is to pass on a message, whether immediately or for later reflection.

So we are going to talk a little bit about the historical content within one of capoeira’s most popular songs: Parana ê. It refers to the War of Paraguay, but what was this war?

It began in 1865 and lasted five years. At the time, Paraguay was the only country in Latin America that could be considered independent, and it found itself in full industrial development, with weapons and gunpowder factories. Unproductive land was being transformed into state plantations, generating employment for the whole population.

Impeding the process of Paraguay was a big challenge for England, because Paraguay became a big competitor in productivity. Brazil and Argentina, on the other hand, were interested in taking possession of parts of Paraguayan land.

The spark that initiated the war occurred on November 24, 1864, when Paraguayan president Solano López cut ties with Brazil, captured the Brazilian ship Marques de Olinda, and invaded the state of Mato Grosso (which, together with Paraná, are the only states that border Paraguay).

At the end of all the battles, the Paraguayans took the worst casualties. 75% of the country’s population was killed; of 800,000 inhabitants, only 194,000 were left. With this victory, England once again returned to economic domination of the region, and Brazil and Argentina managed to take 140,000 kilometers of the land they wanted.

But what about the slaves? How did they enter the War?

The whites “logically” didn’t want to be on the front line of battle, so they created a law saying that blacks who entered the war and returned alive would win their liberty. What the whites didn’t anticipate was that the majority of the blacks who went… actually returned!!

The slaves had an advantage thanks to capoeira, because at the time, battles depended more on hand-to-hand fighting than on weapons. So, on their way back, on the margins of the Paraná River, the now ex-slaves sang:

Vou dizer à minha mulher, Paraná
Capoeira que venceu, Paraná…     [Venceu a guerra]
Paraná ê, Paraná ê, Paraná.
Ela quis bater pé firme, Paraná        [Ela = a guerra]
Isso não aconteceu, Paraná…

I will tell my wife, Paraná
That capoeira won [the war], Paraná
Paraná ê, Paraná ê, Paraná.
It [the war] wanted to stamp its foot hard, Paraná
This did not happen, Paraná

Despite the tragedy for Paraguay, the war was an important milestone in the life of slaves in Brazil. Because of this, it is commemorated to this day in ladainhas and corridos throughout the country.

Here is the original link http://www.capoeira-connection.com/main/content/view/195/73/

Happy Birthday in the Roda

Posted in Capoeira Songs with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 30, 2009 by testcapo

Here is the birthday song in Portuguese. We sing this song for all of the birthday rodas so get to know it. I included a pretty awesome video for you to sing along with. (No, really, this video is great!)

Parabéns pra você
Nesta data querida
Muitas felicidades
Muitos anos de vida!