Archive for the Capoeira Songs Category

What is this noise?

Posted in Capoeira Songs with tags , , , , , , , on September 23, 2009 by testcapo

Here are the lyrics to the song that we were working on last week…..

I got these lyrics of from this link- http://www.capoeira4all.org/songs/index.php?id=82

Que barulho é esse é um tal de zum zum zum? 
Que barulho é esse é um tal de zum zum zum?
Foi o Manduca da praia que acabou de matar um 
Foi o Manduca da praia que acabou de matar um
Quando a policia chegou foi um tal de auê auê 
Quando a policia chegou foi um tal de auê auê
Vamos embora seu moço que essa briga é pra vale 
Vamos embora seu moço que essa briga é pra vale

English translation…

What is this noise, a kind of zoom zoom zoom? 
What is this noise, a kind of zoom zoom zoom?
That was Manduca da Praia who just killed another one 
That was Manduca da Praia who just killed another one
When the police arrived it was a big mess 
When the police arrived it was a big mess
Let’s get out of here, kid ’cause this fight is for real 
Let’s get out of here, kid ’cause this fight is for real



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Check out the new audio link!!!

Posted in Capoeira Songs, Updates! on June 8, 2009 by testcapo

Capoeira Music

Olha a pisada de Lampião

Posted in Capoeira nuggets, Capoeira Songs with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 21, 2009 by testcapo

Lampião

É, É, É, Tum, Tum, Tum

Olha a pisada de Lampião

É, É, É, Tum, Tum, Tum

Lampião desceu a serra

É, É, É, Tum, Tum, Tum

Pra buscar Maria Bonita

É, É, É, Tum, Tum, Tum

Pra ajudar fugir da polícia


Eh, Eh, Eh, Toom, Toom, Toom

See the footsteps of Lampião

Eh, Eh, Eh, Toom, Toom, Toom

Lampião descended from the sierra

Eh, Eh, Eh, Toom, Toom, Toom

To look for Maria bonita

Eh, Eh, Eh, Toom, Toom, Toom

To help escape from the police


This is maybe one of my most favorite songs to sing. But Mr. Lampião had quite the legend. His activity was far more documented making him less mystical than Besouro. He was an outlaw and a mean one at that. He scoured the countrysides with Maria Bonita raising hell.

Here is an article I found off of http://www.brazilbrazil.com that gives a good explanation of who this man was. I am not sure who authored this piece but the the direct link is http://www.brazilbrazil.com/lampiao.html. (I am not quite sure why they titled the article the way they did. Maybe they were playing around with irony. Anyways, read on….)

Lampião – The greatest hero in Brazilian folklore

Virgulino Ferreira da Silva was born in 1897 in the Northeastern state of Pernambuco. This is the hash country described by Euclydes da Cunha in his famous work, The Backlands (Os Sertoes). It is a land of little water, much cactus and scrub vegetation, not unlike that of the American Southwest. Although one of the oldest areas of Brazil, it has traditionally been one of the most backward. Few people received anything beyond a rudimentary education. Local society was ruled by large landholders and political bosses, often one and the same. These bosses and/or landowners had their armed men, just like the big ranchers in Arizona or the Mafia street enforgers. They were called Cangaceiros – men of the Cangaço, as the badlands are called.

lamp.jpg


As Virgulino grew up, he and his family got entangled in the ever-present local feuds, the reason being, of course, defense of honor. The family somehow ended up of the bad side of the local police, and in a raid on his home, Virgulino’s father was killed. It was an event that the police would regret. At age 25, Virgulino became Lampião, the scourge of the backlands and killer of police and soldiers, which he always called macacos (monkeys). For the next 15 years he would never be far from the headlines of newspapers throughout Brazil.

Lampião is often said to be the Robin Hood of Brazil. No way! Not unless Robin Hood started his career robbing sick bed-ridden 90 year old ladies. Lampião was a complex man, religious yet brutal. He was also vain, appearing in dozens of photos and giving interviews whenever possible. His band rarely totaled more than 40 men, but he would fight battles against up to 200 militia or special police.

It is hard to imagine that a small band of bandits was able to operate in the open against state police and troopers for a decade and a half. But in the Northeast of Brazil in the 20s and 30s, the roads were cattle trails, water was scarce, the police corrupt, local bosses were fearful, telegraph lines almost non-existent and people didn’t want any more trouble in their already hard lives. Most of the population had nothing that Lampião or his band wanted.

Cartazlamp.jpg

Hero or bandit?

Captain Virgulino, as Lampião liked to call himself, had no shortage of enemies. The fact that he would shoot any officer or trooper on sight insured that they would be mortal foes. The state and local politicians resented his prestige and power. But catching and killing Lampião was not easy. He knew the country side, he had spies, and he had friends. Most of the police sent against him were not overly enthusiastic about the possibility of getting ambushed in the brush. The cancageiros also had women in their band. The most famous was Maria Bonita (Pretty Mary), Lampião’s companion until death.

Maria Bonita

Maria Bonita

Because the police did nothing against him, most of the people reluctantly helped him. Not many folks joined him, however. Lampião was not a revolutionary, he was a bandit. Those who opposed him could lose everything, including their lives. In the event of betrayal or squealing to the police, the cancageiros were merciless. On the other hand, if Lampião and company came to town, and he had no reason to be mad at you, and you had nothing he wanted, quite often he would arrange a party with music and plenty of cachaça, and everybody would have a grand old time.

lamp_04.jpg

The dark side of Lampião

Not only did Lampião wipe out whole households of enemies at times, he would assault small towns and cities alike, killing police, asking local merchants for “contributions”, seizing any good he could carry off and often distributing those which he could not to the local population. Often women were raped. Mostly, these were women associated with the police and/or any opposing faction. Early in his career, Lampião and over 20 of his band gang raped a young wife of a soldier, while the poor man was forced to watch. Incidents of Lampião digging out a man’s eyeballs with a knife and cutting off a woman’s tongue have also been substantiated.

In 1938, Lampião’s long career ended. In the end, he was betrayed by one of the local supporters, who under threat of torture, told the soldiers were the outlaws were. On a beautiful July morning 50 soldiers armed with machine guns crept up and surprised an equal number of cangaceiros. About forty bandits managed to escape, but the leaders were clearly visible and were targeted in the first shots. Lampião and Maria Bonita were among the dozen bodies left dead after 20 minutes of battle. To insure that the news of Lampião’s often heralded demise would be believed, the soldiers took the heads of the captives to Salvador, were they remained on display for over 30 years.

Lampião's Head

Lampião's Head

Lampiao’s death signaled the end of an era. Maria Bonita and Lampião had a daughter, who is still living last I heard. The cangaceiros still live in popular folklore, cordel literature, comics, TV and movies. Best of all, the band’s favorite song, Mulher Rendera, which they would sing as they went into a town, is a wonderful tune almost every Brazilian knows. For a good (and very romanticized and sanitized) version of Lampião and his merry men, I recommend the movie Lampião, O Rei do Canganço with Leonardo Vilar and Gloria Menezes.

Paraná Eeeeeee!!

Posted in Capoeira nuggets, Capoeira Songs with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 4, 2009 by testcapo

We went over ‘E Paraná’ in our class yesterday and breifly touched on why Paraná is included in several capoeira songs. I was able to pull up an excellent article that goes into more detail…..

This article was taken from http://www.capoeira-connection.com.

Paraná River

Why sing Paraná ê?
Written by Formada Ana Marley & Manuel de Querino
Tuesday, 19 February 2008

Translated into English by Shayna McHugh

Source: Capoeira Santista

Much of capoeira’s philosophy and history is recorded between the lines of its songs, not forgetting that part of this history is linked with that of Brazil. This is why it’s important to research and question the meaning of some songs, since their main purpose is to pass on a message, whether immediately or for later reflection.

So we are going to talk a little bit about the historical content within one of capoeira’s most popular songs: Parana ê. It refers to the War of Paraguay, but what was this war?

It began in 1865 and lasted five years. At the time, Paraguay was the only country in Latin America that could be considered independent, and it found itself in full industrial development, with weapons and gunpowder factories. Unproductive land was being transformed into state plantations, generating employment for the whole population.

Impeding the process of Paraguay was a big challenge for England, because Paraguay became a big competitor in productivity. Brazil and Argentina, on the other hand, were interested in taking possession of parts of Paraguayan land.

The spark that initiated the war occurred on November 24, 1864, when Paraguayan president Solano López cut ties with Brazil, captured the Brazilian ship Marques de Olinda, and invaded the state of Mato Grosso (which, together with Paraná, are the only states that border Paraguay).

At the end of all the battles, the Paraguayans took the worst casualties. 75% of the country’s population was killed; of 800,000 inhabitants, only 194,000 were left. With this victory, England once again returned to economic domination of the region, and Brazil and Argentina managed to take 140,000 kilometers of the land they wanted.

But what about the slaves? How did they enter the War?

The whites “logically” didn’t want to be on the front line of battle, so they created a law saying that blacks who entered the war and returned alive would win their liberty. What the whites didn’t anticipate was that the majority of the blacks who went… actually returned!!

The slaves had an advantage thanks to capoeira, because at the time, battles depended more on hand-to-hand fighting than on weapons. So, on their way back, on the margins of the Paraná River, the now ex-slaves sang:

Vou dizer à minha mulher, Paraná
Capoeira que venceu, Paraná…     [Venceu a guerra]
Paraná ê, Paraná ê, Paraná.
Ela quis bater pé firme, Paraná        [Ela = a guerra]
Isso não aconteceu, Paraná…

I will tell my wife, Paraná
That capoeira won [the war], Paraná
Paraná ê, Paraná ê, Paraná.
It [the war] wanted to stamp its foot hard, Paraná
This did not happen, Paraná

Despite the tragedy for Paraguay, the war was an important milestone in the life of slaves in Brazil. Because of this, it is commemorated to this day in ladainhas and corridos throughout the country.

Here is the original link http://www.capoeira-connection.com/main/content/view/195/73/

Happy Birthday in the Roda

Posted in Capoeira Songs with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 30, 2009 by testcapo

Here is the birthday song in Portuguese. We sing this song for all of the birthday rodas so get to know it. I included a pretty awesome video for you to sing along with. (No, really, this video is great!)

Parabéns pra você
Nesta data querida
Muitas felicidades
Muitos anos de vida!

La Na Beira Do Cais (Lyrics)

Posted in Capoeira Songs with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on April 7, 2009 by testcapo

Thank you Trovão for teaching the lyrics to La Na Beira Do Cais at last weekends Brunch and Berimbaus. Here is a great video with the lyrics. This Youtube video is done by Josie (Maracuja). Not sure what group this capoeirsta is from but I am sure impressed with their capoeira song collection.

La Na Beira Do Cais

De jogar com alegria
Me recordo o respeito, o sorisso no rosto
A maior energia

Lá na beira do Cais
Berimbau se ouvia

Eu chegava de branco
E minha roupa branca voltava limpinha, na beira do Cais

Na beira do Cais, berimbau se ouvia

A roda famosa na beira do Cais,
lá no cais da Bahia, na beira do Cais

Na beira do Cais, berimbau se ouvia

O Malandro jogava,
O sorisso no rosto, a major alegria, na beira do Cais

Na beira do Cais, berimbau se ouvia

A cobra picava,
O veneno da cobra não me atingia, na beira do Cais

Na beira do Cais, berimbau se ouvia

Posted in Capoeira Songs with tags , , , , , on February 23, 2009 by testcapo

CALANGOLO
Calangolo
Como vai como passô
Calangolo
Tem o dia amanhecer
Calangolo
A minha vida e Capoeira
Calangolo
Eu não quero morrer
Calangolo
Eu nasci dessa maneira
Calangolo
Eu não vou esquecer